NYC-based 3D designer and artist.

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3D & INTERACTIVE ART

01 3D & Motion
02 Soon you will be flawless (interactive)



PHOTOGRAPHY / EDITORIAL / SELECTED EXHIBITONS

03 Selected Photography
04 Everyone is Asleep But Me (editorial)
05 If Not Now, When? (exhibition)
06 Human Nature (exhibition)











NYC-based digital designer and artist.



CURRENTLY:
MFA Design & Technology at Parsons

PREVIOUSLY:
UX/UI designer @ Sitelogic Digital
Brand lead @ Tulip Interfaces

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01 THE POP-UP FACTORY

Tulip Interfaces
2019





THE TEAM

UX DESIGN, ILLUSTRATION, ANIMATION:
Angie Lin Boyer

HARDWARE & APPLICATION ENGINEERS:
Dillon Forzese & Joshua Richard

PROCESS ENGINEER:
Anabell Jimenez

PROJECT LEAD:
Saul Lustgarten

Photography on this page provided by Rob Chron
THE BRIEF

The Pop-Up Factory was an interactive experience demonstrating the use of technologie to aid manual assembly work in industrial contexts amidst the ongoing digitization of manufacturing.

In the experience,touch-screen interfaces were integrated with motion sensors, robot arms, and programming jigs in a simulated industrial workbench setting to demonstrate the ways in which technology might be used to augment, not replace, human workers, engaging the relationship between human-computer interactions, automation and labor, in the process.

In partnership with Formlabs, Vention, Right Hand Robotics, and The Public Radio, Tulip created an interactive experience at the Digital Factory Conference in Boston’s Seaport District for an audience of over 600 digital manufacturing technology executives.

With over a thousand executives expected to be in attendance at the conference, our mission was to design an eye-popping, engaging, and user-friendly experience to showcase how our products could come together to build a truly agile production line.




THE SOLUTION
Using Tulip’s software, Formlabs’ 3D printers, and running on Vention workbenches with the help of Right Hand Robotics machinery, the interactive experience allowed conference attendees to assemble and program their own mason jar radios, provided by The Public Radio.






STEP 1: CREATING THE WORK ORDER
The user is guided through the process of customizing the station and knob on their radio, which creates a work order. A barcode label is printed containing their work order information.





STEP 2: GUIDING RADIO ASSEMBLY
At the next station, the user scans the label. This triggers an application that guides them through the process of assembling their radio, with instructions specific to their customization options.




STEP 3: PACKAGING THE RADIO
An animated HMI screen triggers a robotic arm that hands the user a box to package their radio.





CONCLUSION
Over 600 conference attendees visited the Pop-Up Factory and created radios. The installation lives on as an interactive demo for prospective customers at Tulip’s headquarters in Somerville, MA.